Losing My Religion by Ren Powell

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One of my favorite animated poems by Ren Powell.

Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost

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http://www.vimeo.com/6053847

Robert Frost’s famous poem admirably envideoed by film student Jon Mitchell. Since it’s out of copyright, here’s the text:

Nature’s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

There are, as one might easily imagine, skads of Robert Frost videos on the web. The problem is that almost all of them suck.

Constellations by Todd Boss

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Angella Kassube animates a poem by Todd Boss. The poem can also be found in higher-quality video and text forms at the new site MotionPoems.com (no direct links available due to Flash overkill).

The Dragonfly by Louise Bogan

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Louise Bogan reads her poem in this montage by Josep Porcar for the Catalan website Blocs de Lletres. Porcar took the footage from another film on Vimeo: Mary, written and directed by Mel Eslyn. For the text of the poem, see here.

Lady Lazarus by Sylvia Plath

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Sylvia Plath’s own reading of her poem in a video by mishima1970, who seems to specialize in Plath video poems.

Tongues Have No Bones by Kyi May Kaung

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An excerpt from a 30-minute film by Lisa DeLillo with poetry by expatriate Burmese writer Kyi May Kaung. There’s also a second excerpt on YouTube, which includes a prose intro on Burmese politics and censorship, but I preferred this selection for its striking scenes of puppets and dancers miming puppets.

The full-length film was made in 2001, and DeLillo’s website quotes a review by Art Jones from Shout magazine:

To get at what’s real, “Tongues” focuses on that which can’t be subjugated. Social indictments sprout from the small, personal anecdotes of student leaders. The savaging of national character unfolds in the words of noted poet Kyi May Kaung, now a producer with Radio Free Asia. The horrors of “freedom lost” find voice in Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace Prize winner and repeated recipient of Burmese house arrest. Yet most irrepressible are “Tongues” images of Burmese rivers. The water providing life is the same water choked with the blood of civilian casualties, water that DiLillo uses as a constant mirror of all the regime would like hidden.

The Killing of the Trees by Lucille Clifton

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Lucille Clifton in a 1990 public reading, worth watching not just for the excellent reading but for the lengthy introduction as well.