Holy Island by Deborah Buchan

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http://youtu.be/OzAOGh5FaF8

Poem by Deborah Buchan (text here)

Film by Dawn Furness

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Film by Philip Shotton

Both these videos were “commissioned by New Writing North, the literature development agency for the north east of England.”

The Frigidaires of Idaho by Virginia Shank

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Poem and animation by Virginia Shank, with music by One Ring Studio

A rare example of a poet making a video interpretation of her own work — and in claymation yet! She gets huge respect from me. I found more information about the project in a blog post.

It’s nice to see that months of work have turned out so well and it’s hard to believe that Virginia found time to sculpt each frame by hand (for a total of literally thousands of individual frames) when she had three classes to take, a literary magazine (Fugue) to read for, and two classes to teach. But she’s like that – when she’s not making the best sushi for a hundred miles or singing Nancy Sinatra at our weekly MFA karaoke sessions, she’s doing THIS.

Hunger by Billy Collins

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Poem by Billy Collins

Animation by SamuelChristopher/FAD, commissioned by the Sundance Channel’s Action Poetry Series

Nazim Hikmet Oratorio by Fazil Say

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Updated 15 May 2016 with a new video. The text below refers to earlier YouTube uploads of portions of the work.

Nazim Hikmet Oratoryosu, by Fazil Say (at piano)
Poetry by Nazim Hikmet
Bilkent Symphony Orchestra and State Polyphonic Choir, conducted by Ibrahim Yazici
Vocals in “My Country” by Kansu E. Tanca (child) and Genco Erkal; reading in “Traitor” by Zuhal Olcay

To appreciate the first section, it probably helps to know that Hikmet spent most of his adult life in exile. In fact, his citizenship was only just restored, posthumously, 46 years after his death.

One more section of the oratorio with English subtitles seems worth sharing, despite the fact that the video ends abruptly. The subtitles here are in captioning that must be turned on via the arrow-shaped icon on the bottom right corner of the video.

[dead link]

The poem is Yasamaya Dair, “On Living,” and the translation here is by Randy Blasing and Mutlu Konuk. Poetry doesn’t get much more life-affirming than this — at least, not without turning into very bad poetry. I love that Nazim puts grief at the center of it, as the source or motive for our determination to live fully.

Heart Wrap by Shamshad Khan

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Poem by Shamshad Khan

Film by Lisa Risbec, with narration by the author
Commissioned by Comma Film

One Art by Elizabeth Bishop

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Poem by Elizabeth Bishop

Film by Erica Tachoir

One of the more unique and ambitious approaches to the video poetry genre I’ve seen so far. I like the meta- aspect here, what the film says about readers and how poems intertwine with their lives. I also like the implicit judgement against people who can’t tolerate poetic expression.

The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams

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Poem by William Carlos Williams

Animation by Lee Luker, with music by Six Organs of Admittance

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Written and directed by Kira Rouse with art by Jeffrey Rouse and sound by Digital Scientist

Hard to say what WCW would’ve made of this one, but it’s an interesting testament to the ubiquity of his poem.