Nationality: United States

on a prophet by Kathleen Roberts

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker:

she says that she
is learning to be immortal
although it has not
been easy
she’s trying to learn
to stop eating she says
nourishment
distracts the body
from its truth…

Indiana-based graphic designer and poet Dave Richardson, best known in the videopoetry world for his 2012 piece “The Mantis Shrimp,” combines forces with poet Kathleen Roberts to make this affecting and effective videopoem “for the upcoming show With Sirens Blaring at the Prøve Collective in Duluth, Minnesota, August 8-23, 2014.” I usually find it distracting to have a poem appear both in the soundtrack and in words on the screen simultaneously, but somehow Richardson makes it work. He gives a bit more detail about the exhibition on his blog:

Prøve Collective, in Duluth, Minnesota, will display a body of work linking poetry to visual, film, and sound art. Pursuant to a grant from the McKnight Foundation, award-winning Duluth poet Kathleen Roberts is creating an assembly of films and artwork by local and regional artists based on her words. These works will be displayed permanently on her website and in Prøve’s August exhibition, “With Sirens Blaring,” August 8-23, 2014.

Prøve Gallery is “a contemporary and experimental art gallery located in downtown Duluth.” Kathleen Roberts is the literary director.

Some small room for surprise by Jen Karetnick

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker:

Nic Sebastian’s latest video remix incorporating a text from the Poetry Storehouse uses a soundtrack by Elan Hickler. The poet, Jen Karetnick, blogs at A Body at Rest. See her full collection of poems at the Storehouse for a bio.

Epitaph in Reverse by Bianca Stone

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker:

Brooklyn-based poet and artist Bianca Stone is well known for her poetry comics, but she also makes poetry videos. This animation was featured back in April on the always-invaluable Tin House Reels. Ilana Simons writes:

Epitaph in Reverse, today’s feature from Bianca Stone, includes the sort of artistic play that shows the author’s permissive relationship to her own creative mind. There is an elasticity to Stone’s process- she lets ink drops bleed, invites smudging, and whitewashes sections of her drawings for an explicit redo.

“Since I end up eviscerating the art during the filming, I sometimes start with old drawings that I’m ok deconstructing,” Stone says. “It’s really a trial and error. Which is fun as hell. I like to think of the process of making the video as a big part of the final product. In other words, you see a lot of my process in the final product.”

Stone describes her method of creation as such: “I sit at my drafting table and use my iphone usually, with a tiny tripod and a bright light on. I’m always alone. I have a beer. I first start taking pictures of the drawing I’ve started. I draw and photograph, draw and photograph, until my phone gets too hot. Then I load the photos into imovie and play with speed and filters. I find a song that fits or record my own music on GarageBand. A video takes me about five hours, depending on the length of the poem.”

The result is wild play, with guts.

Read the rest.

Stone’s blog appears to have gone missing from her long-time URL poetrycomics.com—temporarily, I hope. In the meantime, check out more of her work on YouTube. (And in some nice synchronicity, she has a poem up today on Poetry Daily.)

All American by David Hernandez

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker:

If the films released so far on their website are any indication, Motionpoems‘ 2014 season is their most stylistically diverse collection of poetry films to date. This film, released just before Independence Day in the U.S., builds on the poem’s challenge to any easy assumptions about American identity. (It’s also slightly NSFW, with glimpses of female nudity.) Here’s the description from the website:

Filmed near Lake Geneva Switzerland (and at the Large Hadron Collider at Cern), British filmmaker Richard Johnson and dancer Jasmine Morand present this francoperspective on California poet David Hernandez’s all-inclusive poem, “All American.”

Click through and scroll down for the text.

There’s more than one filmmaker named Richard Johnson, but I’m guessing this is the proper filmmaker and website. For more on the poet, visit DavidHernandez.com.

Hij morrelt aan je ziel / He fumbles at your Soul by Emily Dickinson

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker:

This is Dickinson’s poem F477 (1862)/J315, translated into Dutch by J. Eijkelboom and into film by Marc Neys, A.K.A. Swoon, who says he began with an old reading he had made of the poem, building an experimental soundtrack around it.

The track was (except for the electronic ‘drumthumbs’ in the back) completely constructed out of (altered) sounds I made with my mouth. A fun experiment. For some reason the track worked quite well with that old recording. Maybe there was a short video in it too?

Keeping a similar kind of restriction as I did with the sounds, I wanted only one short piece of footage in the video; leaves.

The whole thing was created in one afternoon (and it probably shows), but I had fun doing so. Keeping it simple and fresh.

A fun inbetweenie stuffed between longer videos and ongoing projects.

Aphorism by Eric Burke

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker:

A brief Eric Burke poem at the Poetry Storehouse made into a film by Jutta Pryor with music by Masonik. The poem originally appeared in A cappella Zoo before its second life in the Poetry Storehouse, and frequent Storehouse contributor Othniel Smith has also envideoed it.

Aerial Manoeuvres by Robert Peake

Poet: | Nationality: | Filmmaker: ,

A new poetry film from the husband-and-wife team of Robert Peake and Valerie Kampmeier. Peake posted the text to his blog along with some brief process notes, which are worth quoting in full, since they show how organically the film developed:

I had a feeling of the kind of film-poem I wanted to create here, something about flight. I used Blender to render a flock of birds and then composited them together with historic aviation footage from the Prelinger Archives. The poem wrote itself after that, and Valerie’s piano accompaniment followed. We also recorded birdsong on an H1 Zoom and looped it to create a backdrop of sound.