Nationality: United States

Vocab Lab by Linh Dinh

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Vietnamese-American poet Linh Dinh has a number of video poems on YouTube, all of them in this rather crudely produced, grungy style. I really like “Vocab Lab” — for the poem, if not necessarily the video. But the latter does have its moments.

How Spring Arrives by James Wright

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Despite some technical problems with the video quality, I’ve decided I really like this simple film by Theresa Williams, not least because it uses a recording of James Wright reading his own poem, and he was a great reader.

Mulberry Fields by Lucille Clifton

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UnLStD-pYk

Sad that it’s taken me this long to post something by one of my favorite poets, Lucille Clifton, but I’m not crazy about the animation here, by Jason Walczyk. Like many if not most of the animations sponsored by the Poetry Foundation, in its effort to make the poem accessible it ends up diminishing much of its mystery and power.

The text of the poem is here.

The Parentage of the Dix Pear by Ren Powell

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Poem and animation by Ren Powell

For a higher quality version, see AnimaPoetics.

A Julia de Burgos (To Julia de Burgos)

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Julia de Burgos‘ poem to her public self (Spanish text here). Leonard Bernstein conducts the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival Orchestra in a television performance of a work he composed, Songfest, which borrows texts from various American poets. Daisy Newman is the soprano. In a 1986 review of a Deutsche Grammophon recording, Music critic Edward Greenfield wrote,

If I had to choose one work of Bernstein’s for my Desert Island, it would certainly be Songfest, a cycle of 12 American poems which in its sharpness of imagination brings out Bernstein’s finest qualities. Rather like Britten in the Nocturne and the Serenade, he combines musical ingenuity with illuminatingly poetic response to each poem. The result is not just witty and brilliant, as you would expect, but often intensely beautiful and deeply moving, as in the haunting Whitman love poem and the radiant setting for women’s trio of Anne Bradstreet’s poem ”To my dear and loving husband”.

To watch the entire song cycle on YouTube, start here.

I’m not sure which translation they used for the subtitles (perhaps Bernstein’s own?) but a better one, by Jack Agüeros, may be read here.

Ay, Ay, Ay de la Grifa Negra by Julia de Burgos

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YADagH8ipY

Poem by Julia de Burgos, translated by Jack Agüeros

I’ve been looking for videos of poems by the great 20th-century Puerto Rican poet and feminist Julia de Burgos in honor of the confinrmation hearings of Sonia Sotomayor, so I was happy to run across this installment from the generally wonderful Favorite Poem Project, featuring bilingual public school teacher Glaisma Perez-Silva.

Dark Cities by Stacie M. Kiner, Jan McLaughlin and Bruce Weber

A 16mm, ten-minute-long film “based on a poem by Stacie M. Kiner, Jan McLaughlin and Bruce Weber,” directed by Edward J. Reasor and produced/written by Jan McLaughlin. For the rest of the credits, see here.