Nationality: United States

The Dragonfly by Louise Bogan

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Louise Bogan reads her poem in this montage by Josep Porcar for the Catalan website Blocs de Lletres. Porcar took the footage from another film on Vimeo: Mary, written and directed by Mel Eslyn. For the text of the poem, see here.

Lady Lazarus by Sylvia Plath

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Sylvia Plath’s own reading of her poem in a video by mishima1970, who seems to specialize in Plath video poems.

The Killing of the Trees by Lucille Clifton

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Lucille Clifton in a 1990 public reading, worth watching not just for the excellent reading but for the lengthy introduction as well.

Yoing by Mikki LeMoine

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http://blip.tv/the-faux-press-blip-tv-division/yoing-a-film-poem-234109

A 30-second, 35-mm film by Jan McLaughlin based on a poem by Mikki LeMoine. More information at the Blip.tv page.

The Menage by Carl Rakoski

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A poem by Carl Rakoski, read and illustrated by poet Anne Waldman and film artist Ed Bowes. I especially liked the sparing use of song.

The Fish by Marianne Moore

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“An experimental video based on a Marianne Moore poem,” says Erik Carlson. The voice is that of the poet. I think the video really gets inside the modernist worldview, so to me it’s a good match.

The poem should be public domain now, I believe, so here’s the text:

The Fish

wade
through black jade.
Of the crow-blue mussel-shells, one keeps
adjusting the ash-heaps;
opening and shutting itself like

an
injured fan.
The barnacles which encrust the side
of the wave, cannot hide
there for the submerged shafts of the

sun,
split like spun
glass, move themselves with spotlight swiftness
into the crevices —
in and out, illuminating

the
turquoise sea
of bodies. The water drives a wedge
of iron throught the iron edge
of the cliff; whereupon the stars,

pink
rice-grains, ink-
bespattered jelly fish, crabs like green
lilies, and submarine
toadstools, slide each on the other.

All
external
marks of abuse are present on this
defiant edifice —
all the physical features of

ac-
cident — lack
of cornice, dynamite grooves, burns, and
hatchet strokes, these things stand
out on it; the chasm-side is

dead.
Repeated
evidence has proved that it can live
on what can not revive
its youth. The sea grows old in it.

Transborder Immigrant Tool – Transition by Amy Sara Carroll

This is one of a series of videos from Transborder Immigrant Tool: Mexico/U.S Border Disturbance Art Project, an initiative to give GPS technology to economic refugees from Mexico trying to enter the United States. The video uses imagery from the Virtual Hiker Algorithm, a video game-like GPS application for mobile phones developed by one of the members of the project. As the About page explains:

The border between the U.S. and Mexico has moved between the virtual and the all too real since before the birth of the two nation-states. This has allowed a deep archive of suspect movement across this border to be traced and tagged – specifically anchoredto immigrants bodies moving north, while immigrant bodies moving south much less so. The danger of moving north across this border is not a question of politics, but vertiginous geography. Hundreds of people have died crossing the U.S./Mexico border due to not being able to tell where they are in relation to where they have been and which direction they need to go to reach their destination safely. Now with the rise of multiple distributed geospatial information systems (such as the Google Earth Project for example), GPS (Global Positioning System) and the developing Virtual Hiker Algorithm by artist Brett Stalbaum it is now possible to develop useful Transborder Tools for Immigrants – and allow virtual geography to mark new trails and potentially safer routes across this desert of the real.

An article in MobileActive.org gives additional information on the technical aspects of the project.

For the text of the poem, see the blog post, which also supplies the following context and credits:

Video exhibited in ‘Space is the Place’ exhibition at the Gallery of the National College of Art & Design in Dublin, as part of the program of ISEA 2009 which takes place in Belfast and Dublin Ireland this year. The exhibition will run from the 27th August – 1st September 2009.

Text of poems: Amy Sara Carroll

Video poems design: Ricardo Dominguez, Micha Cárdenas, and Elle Mehrmand

Voices included in the poems: Micha Cárdenas, Amy Sara Carroll, Césaire Carroll-Dominguez, Patrick Carroll, and Ricardo Dominguez

Collaborative inspiration: Brett Stalbaum