Posts in Category: Animation

Smell! by William Carlos Williams

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William Carlos Williams’ own recitation of his poem is included in the soundtrack of this animation by Isaac Holland. The video is part of the Poetry of Perception series commissioned by Harvard for its Fundamentals of Neuroscience course.

Split the Lark — and you’ll find the Music by Emily Dickinson

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An animation by Lily Fang, part of the Poetry of Perception series for the Harvard University course Fundamentals of Neuroscience. Sarah Jessop provided the voiceover with music by Skillbard. The epigraph is by Igor Stravinsky: “I haven’t understood a bar of music in my life, but I’ve felt it.”

J’ai tant rêvé de toi / I Have Dreamed of You So Much by Robert Desnos

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An animation of Desnos’ poem produced for French television by Emma Vakarelova.

We grow accustomed to the Dark by Emily Dickinson

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An animation by Hannah Jacobs, part of a series called “Poetry of Perception” for the Harvard University course Fundamentals of Neuroscience. Here’s the Vimeo description:

An eight-part series (vimeo.com/channels/972301) on representations of perception and sensation made for fundamentalsofneuroscience.com. “Both artists and scientists strive, even if in different ways, toward the goal of discovering new uniformities or lawful regularities.” Hermann Helmholtz

Words by Emily Dickinson
Animation by Hannah Jacobs hellohannahjacobs.com
Narration by Anna Martine
Sound + Music by Oswald Skillbard skillbard.com
Produced by Nadja Oertelt nadjaoertelt.com

Hat-tip: Cinematic Poems, a blog somewhat like Moving Poems that’s dedicated to what it calls “an important emerging creative short film genre.”

All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace by Richard Brautigan

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Richard Brautigan‘s famous 1967 poem may be treated as holy writ by Silicon Valley dipshits who pray for the advent of the singularity, but that doesn’t stop it from being a fascinating cultural artifact in its own right. So I was pleased to see this fine student film by Edward Phillips Hill, which also includes something I’ve never seen before: process notes right in the end credits.

  • stop animation because it’s a physical/tactile medium
  • the other images that flash by are either screen captures of social media or images taken from my phone camera while looking at social media, in essence looking through the technology seeing what is being ignored
  • the music was chosen as it resembles a techno song yet played by acoustic instruments, thus furthering the duality of modern life & the constant push and pull between ‘technological’ life and ‘real’ life

Break and Remake by Martha McCollough

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A new videopoem by artist and poet Martha McCollough always makes me do a little dance of pure delight. Break and Remake debuted on Atticus Review a week ago, and I’ve held off on sharing it till now (not wanting to steal their thunder) only with great difficulty. Here’s how McCollough introduced it:

Break and Remake came out of thinking about the recombined creatures in myths and in the margins of medieval manuscripts. The whole video is broken and reassembled, as are the griffins, chimeras, and other monsters within the video. The text is also a hybrid, combining overheard remarks, a line from a song by Son House and computer-generated text from spam.

Long Rong Song by OTTARAS

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The Norwegian concrete poet Ottar Ormstad and Russian composer Taras Mashtalir form the duo OTTARAS, currently looking for live performance venues. This video was produced in collaboration with Russian video artist Alexander Vojjov, and “exists in different versions made for screening and live performance,” according the Vimeo description.

Projected on a grid of particles that at times seem ordered, while sometimes chaotic and always in flux, Ormstad’s constructed language poetry is exposed and read by the author while performing to Mashtalirs pulsating music. Is everything connected to one another in the sphere that is shaping before the viewer’s eyes? How does language relate to the atmospheric scapes Vojjov creates of numbers, geometric forms and abstract shapes? LONG RONG SONG (2015) conveys Ormstad’s language research project that is based on AUDITION FOR FENOMENER UTEN BETEGNELSE (Audition for Phenomena without a Name), his second book of concrete poetry (2004). In the video, Ormstad reads through a cycle of 5 poems that present combinations of four letters made of an artifical language system that he has created and which may, or may not result in words commonly used in latin languages. […] Raising awareness of electronic poetry and sonic ecology, attracting new audience to a potent yet to come genre is the inspiration for this collaboration.
The video is produced in HD 16:9 in color, stereo, duration 05:26
Animation: Alexander Vojjov
Music: Taras Mashtalir
Concrete poetry, voice & production: Ottar Ormstad
© Ottar Ormstad 2015

I find it a mesmerizing hybrid of concrete and sound poetry—a great example of how an effective video can make avant-garde poetry approachable.

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